inthenoosphere
I see a strong parallel between the evolution of robot intelligence and the biological intelligence that preceded it. The largest nervous systems doubled in size about every fifteen million years since the Cambrian explosion 550 million years ago. Robot controllers double in complexity (processing power) every year or two. They are now barely at the lower range of vertebrate complexity, but should catch up with us within a half century.
Hans Moravec (via inthenoosphere)
nightsinneon
nightsinneon:

Diagrams from Geometrical psychology, or, The science of representation: an abstract of the theories and diagrams of B. W. Betts (1887) by Louisa S. Cook, which details New Zealander Benjamin Bett’s remarkable attempts to mathematically model the evolution of human consciousness through geometric forms.

nightsinneon:

Diagrams from Geometrical psychology, or, The science of representation: an abstract of the theories and diagrams of B. W. Betts (1887) by Louisa S. Cook, which details New Zealander Benjamin Bett’s remarkable attempts to mathematically model the evolution of human consciousness through geometric forms.

wildcat2030

wildcat2030:

Ronald van Tienhoven - Techno Animism

Once upon a time animism ruled people’s beliefs: both organisms and objects were imbued with a conscience. Artist Ronald van Tienhoven states that as technology closes the gap between organisms and objects, a new form of techno-animism arises.

(by nextnature)

…we developed a Formal Theory of Fun and Creativity that formally explains science & art & music & humor, to the extent that we can begin to build artificial scientists and artists.

Jürgen Schmidhuber

{ When creative machines overtake man }
March 31, 2012

••••••

Schmidhuber’s { Formal Theory of Creativity }.

I haven’t had a chance to read it yet, but can’t wait. It sounds like deep, murky, dangerous waters he’s treading into… full of horrifying art theories and theorists :(

And yet, { I think it’s an excellent pursuit }.

{ When creative machines overtake man }March 31, 2012 by Jürgen Schmidhuber

When I was a boy, I wanted to become a physicist like my hero Einstein until I realized as a teenager the much bigger impact of building a scientist smarter than myself (my colleagues claim that should be easy), letting him do the remaining work.
…
Let me show you this pattern of exponential acceleration of the most important events in human history, which started 40,000 years ago with the emergence of Homo Sapiens Sapiens from Africa.
[an excellent timeline that you should click on the link to read about, but a bit long to re-post]
…
Now you say: OK, maybe computers will be faster and better pattern recognizers, but they will never be creative! But that’s too pessimistic. In my group at the Swiss AI Lab IDSIA, we developed a Formal Theory of Fun and Creativity that formally explains science & art & music & humor, to the extent that we can begin to build artificial scientists and artists. …

••••••
Do read on — it’s a really good piece: interesting, funny, & vastly informative.
Also watch Jürgen Schmidhuber’s lecture about { The Algorithmic Principe Behind Curiosity and Creativity }.

{ When creative machines overtake man }
March 31, 2012 by Jürgen Schmidhuber

When I was a boy, I wanted to become a physicist like my hero Einstein until I realized as a teenager the much bigger impact of building a scientist smarter than myself (my colleagues claim that should be easy), letting him do the remaining work.

Let me show you this pattern of exponential acceleration of the most important events in human history, which started 40,000 years ago with the emergence of Homo Sapiens Sapiens from Africa.

[an excellent timeline that you should click on the link to read about, but a bit long to re-post]

Now you say: OK, maybe computers will be faster and better pattern recognizers, but they will never be creative! But that’s too pessimistic. In my group at the Swiss AI Lab IDSIA, we developed a Formal Theory of Fun and Creativity that formally explains science & art & music & humor, to the extent that we can begin to build artificial scientists and artists. …

••••••

Do read on — it’s a really good piece: interesting, funny, & vastly informative.

Also watch Jürgen Schmidhuber’s lecture about { The Algorithmic Principe Behind Curiosity and Creativity }.

Ray Kurzweil (figurehead of the { futurist } & { transhumanist } movements) responds to { The Singularity isn’t Near } Paul Allen’s (co-founder of Microsoft & chairman of Vulcan) & Mark Greaves’ (computer scientist, Vulcan’s director for knowledge systems) response to Kurzweil’s original essay “The Law of Accelerating Returns”, & the theory discussed in his book, { The Singularity is Near }.

Carl Sagan, “Cosmos”, Episode 2: A Voice in the Cosmic Fugue

In the above episode, aired 1980, Sagan explores the topic of our evolution from space dust to the life we see today. Towards the end there’s an update, recorded 10 years later, during which he considers what the study of biology would be like if we had a second example of life.

20 years later, Gerald Joyce has created life-like { evolving RNA molecules }, aided only by the researchers’ addition of “food” & environment maintenance. He hopes to soon enable them to become more like life — to create their own sustenance, and to become a self-sufficient biosphere. A second example of life, created in the lab. Almost.

Elsewhere, NIST researchers are { wrapping carbon nanotubes in modified DNA strands } to “select for one of the [preferred] semiconductor forms of carbon nanotubes”.

EDIT // August 30, 2011:
{ NIST finds carbon nanotube reliability problems }

••••••

I wonder if hardware and computers (as opposed to wetware) will be the correct medium for artificial intelligence, as we proceed into the future?

Princeton wordnet defines AI as:

the branch of computer science that deal with writing computer programs that can solve problems creatively; “workers in AI hope to imitate or duplicate intelligence in computers and robots”

That’s the contemporary idea. But what happens when we begin creating biological life-forms, biological machines, and teaching them? Currently the question is more in the realm of sci-fi than science, but… if the Artificial is that “made or produced by human beings rather than occurring naturally”, where does that place lab-made life and its intelligence? Is it AI? Or is it not, because that’s something more like instigating a natural process than it is programming an imitation of life? It’s especially curious in terms of post-humanism, in understanding AI as an imitation that (at the Singularity?) becomes sentient, and self-sufficient — becomes a living bundle of atoms… kind of like in Egan’s { Permutation City }…

"Babelizing" the sentence, "I’m Interested in quantum physics." hailed:
→ Portuguese

Estou interessado em física quântica.
→ English
I’m interested in quantum physics.
→ Japanese
私は、量子物理学に興味がある。
→ English
I am interested in quantum physics.
→ Chinese
我在量子物理的兴趣。
→ English
I am interested in quantum physics.
→ Hungarian
Érdekel a kvantumfizika.
→ English
I am interested in quantum physics.
→ Icelandic
Ég hef áhuga á skammtafræði eðlisfræði.
→ English
I’m interested in quantum physics.


^ This is awesome.
Read:
{ Norvig vs. Chomsky and the Fight for the Future of AI }— will the future of science be focused entirely on making predictions using algorithms?

On May 14-15 2011, Humanity+ International is partnering with Parsons The New School for Design in New York City to produce Transhumanism Meets Design, a conference exploring emerging technology, transdisciplinary design, culture and media theory, and biotech.

The conference brings together futurists, cyberneticists, life extensionists, singularity advocates, A[G]I and robotics experts, human enhancement specialists, inventors, ethicists, philosophers, and theorists to meet with the creativity and rigorous scholarship of design at Parsons.

••••••

YES!

So the scientists and the artists have something in common — they always try to make new data which is compressible in a new, previously unknown way. A new pattern, another pattern, means Yes, it’s compressible, but in a way that I didn’t know yet. Especially if my compressor can make this learning progress, and can save a couple of [processing] bits.

Jürgen Schmidhuber at Singularity Summit 2009 - Compression Progress: The Algorithmic Principle Behind Curiosity and Creativity

{ ~17:30 }

Jürgen Schmidhuber at Singularity Summit 2009 - Compression Progress: The Algorithmic Principle Behind Curiosity and Creativity

••••••

Jürgen talks about our perception of “beauty” which comes down to the system’s preference for simplifying information: a “pretty” face is often that which fits best with our existing data set. Similarly, things we like (new music, new art, new scientific discoveries) are essentially re-iterations of old data in a new way, which clarifies that previous set and organizes it into a pattern — it’s not necessarily simplification so much as organization of chaos. We are pattern-seekers.