[Artificial Intelligence] may well be the most vital of all commodities, surpassing water, food, heat and light. Without it, we will certainly not survive as a species.

One of our problems is data - masses of it. A few hundred years of scientific inquiry and the invention of the data-generating and sharing mechanism that is the internet has left reams of crucial information unused and unanalysed.

AI is not about sentient robots, but machines that mimic our organic intelligence by adapting to, as well as recognising, patterns in data. AI is about making machines understand.
Jamie Carter / Peter Cochrane, { South China Morning Post }
tsunamis
How I’m rushing through this! How much each sentence in this brief story contains. “The stars are made of the same atoms as the earth.” I usually pick one small topic like this to give a lecture on. Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars — mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is “mere.” I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination — stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern — of which I am a part — perhaps my stuff is was belched from some forgotten star, as one is belching there. Or see them with the greater eye of Palomar, rushing all apart from some common starting point when they were perhaps all together. What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the /why/? It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined! Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia, must be silent?

Richard Feynman, Six Easy Pieces, 59-60, footnote. via { olena }

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Reblogging, from “1 year ago on June 07, 2011”.

I like that hurri[k]anes reblogged this, and tsunamis followed. :D

{ When creative machines overtake man }March 31, 2012 by Jürgen Schmidhuber

When I was a boy, I wanted to become a physicist like my hero Einstein until I realized as a teenager the much bigger impact of building a scientist smarter than myself (my colleagues claim that should be easy), letting him do the remaining work.
…
Let me show you this pattern of exponential acceleration of the most important events in human history, which started 40,000 years ago with the emergence of Homo Sapiens Sapiens from Africa.
[an excellent timeline that you should click on the link to read about, but a bit long to re-post]
…
Now you say: OK, maybe computers will be faster and better pattern recognizers, but they will never be creative! But that’s too pessimistic. In my group at the Swiss AI Lab IDSIA, we developed a Formal Theory of Fun and Creativity that formally explains science & art & music & humor, to the extent that we can begin to build artificial scientists and artists. …

••••••
Do read on — it’s a really good piece: interesting, funny, & vastly informative.
Also watch Jürgen Schmidhuber’s lecture about { The Algorithmic Principe Behind Curiosity and Creativity }.

{ When creative machines overtake man }
March 31, 2012 by Jürgen Schmidhuber

When I was a boy, I wanted to become a physicist like my hero Einstein until I realized as a teenager the much bigger impact of building a scientist smarter than myself (my colleagues claim that should be easy), letting him do the remaining work.

Let me show you this pattern of exponential acceleration of the most important events in human history, which started 40,000 years ago with the emergence of Homo Sapiens Sapiens from Africa.

[an excellent timeline that you should click on the link to read about, but a bit long to re-post]

Now you say: OK, maybe computers will be faster and better pattern recognizers, but they will never be creative! But that’s too pessimistic. In my group at the Swiss AI Lab IDSIA, we developed a Formal Theory of Fun and Creativity that formally explains science & art & music & humor, to the extent that we can begin to build artificial scientists and artists. …

••••••

Do read on — it’s a really good piece: interesting, funny, & vastly informative.

Also watch Jürgen Schmidhuber’s lecture about { The Algorithmic Principe Behind Curiosity and Creativity }.

William Hogarth’s Line of Beauty
Image via Leonard J. Mirin{ History of European Architecture } at Cornell

The Line of Beauty is a term and a theory in art or aesthetics used to describe an S-shaped curved line (a serpentine line) appearing within an object, as the boundary line of an object, or  as a virtual boundary line formed by the composition of several  objects. This theory originated with William Hogarth (18th century English painter, satirist, and writer), and is an  essential part of Hogarth’s theory of Aesthetics as described in his Analysis of Beauty (1753). According to this theory, S-Shaped curved lines signify  liveliness and activity and excite the attention of the viewer as  contrasted with straight lines, parallel lines, or right-angled  intersecting lines which signify stasis, death, or inanimate objects.
{ Wiki }


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Seeing the S-Curve in EverythingJul 20, 2011DURHAM, N.C.{ Duke }: Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science
From economic trends, population growth, the spread of cancer, or the adoption of new technology, certain patterns inevitably seem to emerge. A new technology, for example, begins with slow acceptance, followed by explosive growth, only to level off before “hitting the wall.”When plotted on graph, this pattern of growth takes the shape of an “S.”While this S-curve has long been recognized by economists and scientists, a Duke University professor believes that a theory he developed explains the reason for the prevalence of this particular pattern, and thus provides a scientific basis for its appearance throughout nature and the man-made world.“This phenomenon is so common that it has generated entire fields of research that seem unrelated – the spread of biological populations, chemical reactions, contaminants, languages, information and economic activity,” said Adrian Bejan, engineering professor at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering. “We have shown that this pattern can be predicted entirely as a natural flow design.”The concept of flow design, whether it be energy, rivers or human populations, is central to Bejan’s theory.
…

William Hogarth’s Line of Beauty

Image via Leonard J. Mirin
{ History of European Architecture } at Cornell

The Line of Beauty is a term and a theory in art or aesthetics used to describe an S-shaped curved line (a serpentine line) appearing within an object, as the boundary line of an object, or as a virtual boundary line formed by the composition of several objects. This theory originated with William Hogarth (18th century English painter, satirist, and writer), and is an essential part of Hogarth’s theory of Aesthetics as described in his Analysis of Beauty (1753). According to this theory, S-Shaped curved lines signify liveliness and activity and excite the attention of the viewer as contrasted with straight lines, parallel lines, or right-angled intersecting lines which signify stasis, death, or inanimate objects.

{ Wiki }

••••••

Seeing the S-Curve in Everything
Jul 20, 2011
DURHAM, N.C.
{ Duke }: Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science

From economic trends, population growth, the spread of cancer, or the adoption of new technology, certain patterns inevitably seem to emerge. A new technology, for example, begins with slow acceptance, followed by explosive growth, only to level off before “hitting the wall.”

When plotted on graph, this pattern of growth takes the shape of an “S.”

While this S-curve has long been recognized by economists and scientists, a Duke University professor believes that a theory he developed explains the reason for the prevalence of this particular pattern, and thus provides a scientific basis for its appearance throughout nature and the man-made world.

“This phenomenon is so common that it has generated entire fields of research that seem unrelated – the spread of biological populations, chemical reactions, contaminants, languages, information and economic activity,” said Adrian Bejan, engineering professor at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering. “We have shown that this pattern can be predicted entirely as a natural flow design.”

The concept of flow design, whether it be energy, rivers or human populations, is central to Bejan’s theory.