Image: Issey Miyake
Christopher Forte: { Japan — An Ascetic Aesthetic }

There is a notion of modesty and subtlety, a respect for ceremony and procedure, an approach to duty and honor – that is unique to Japan. To the western eye these values are construed as anything from hopelessly anachronistic to downright obsessive – yet they contribute to a reverence for aesthetics that is utterly unique and exquisitely complex. This distinctive approach to all that appeals to the senses has, over centuries, imbued the Japanese with a veritable omnibus of terms that define everything from the simplest idea of placement (shibui: austerity of taste – not concealing the true nature of an object – a vase is a vase, a toaster is a toaster…) to the most esoteric concepts of shaping space (aji: where the incongruity of the object speaks of the congruity of the whole – the idea of sleeves filled with nothing, of space filled only with color…)

Image: Issey Miyake

Christopher Forte: { Japan — An Ascetic Aesthetic }

There is a notion of modesty and subtlety, a respect for ceremony and procedure, an approach to duty and honor – that is unique to Japan. To the western eye these values are construed as anything from hopelessly anachronistic to downright obsessive – yet they contribute to a reverence for aesthetics that is utterly unique and exquisitely complex. This distinctive approach to all that appeals to the senses has, over centuries, imbued the Japanese with a veritable omnibus of terms that define everything from the simplest idea of placement (shibui: austerity of taste – not concealing the true nature of an object – a vase is a vase, a toaster is a toaster…) to the most esoteric concepts of shaping space (aji: where the incongruity of the object speaks of the congruity of the whole – the idea of sleeves filled with nothing, of space filled only with color…)


Andrea Zittel began creating Six Month Uniforms in 1991 as a response to the social dictate to wear an entirely different change of clothes every day. By wearing a single uniform for six months, she no only eliminated the stress of choosing a daily outfit , but also generated an alternative to the mandate of  perpetual variety mandated consumer culture. More than seventy variations of the A-Z Personal Uniform now exist. …

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I’d be ok with wearing this one for 6 months.

Andrea Zittel began creating Six Month Uniforms in 1991 as a response to the social dictate to wear an entirely different change of clothes every day. By wearing a single uniform for six months, she no only eliminated the stress of choosing a daily outfit , but also generated an alternative to the mandate of  perpetual variety mandated consumer culture. More than seventy variations of the A-Z Personal Uniform now exist. …

••••••

I’d be ok with wearing this one for 6 months.