Image: A proton collides with a lead nucleus, sending a shower of particles through the ALICE detector. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments also recorded collisions. Credit: Alice/CERN
Collisions between protons and lead ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced surprising behavior in some of the particles created by the collisions. The new observation suggests the collisions may have produced a new type of matter known as color-glass condensate.
via { Phys.org }

Image: A proton collides with a lead nucleus, sending a shower of particles through the ALICE detector. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments also recorded collisions. Credit: Alice/CERN

Collisions between protons and lead ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced surprising behavior in some of the particles created by the collisions. The new observation suggests the collisions may have produced a new type of matter known as color-glass condensate.

via { Phys.org }

A solid object like a rock is almost entirely filled with empty space and only feels solid due to electrical repulsion forces.

{ Intuitor }

••••••

Maybe obvious / old news to some of you, but seriously:

go grab some thing hard (ha, ha) and think about that. Imagine that!

That is, in part, what Neil deGrasse Tyson means when he says { “If you’re scientifically literate the world looks very different to you." }

The universe was a disorderly mess, the only interesting bits being the organised anomalies. Hackworth had once taken his family out rowing on the pond in the park, and the ends of the yellow oars spun off compact vortices, and Fiona, who had taught herself the physics of liquids through numerous experimental beverage spills and in the bathtub, demanded an explanation for these holes in water. She leaned over the gunwale, Gwendolyn holding the sash of her dress, and felt those vortices with her hands, wanting to understand them. The rest of the pond, simply water in no particular order, was uninteresting.
Neal Stephenson,
The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer
We ignore the blackness of outer space and pay attention to the stars, especially if they seem to order themselves into constellations. “Common as the air” meant something worthless, but Hackworth knew that every breath of air that Fiona drew, lying in her little bed at night, just a silver flow in the moonlight, was used by her body to make skin and hair and bones. The air became Fiona, and deserving—no, demanding—of love. Ordering matter was the sole endeavor of Life, whether it was a jumble of self-replicating molecules in the primordial ocean, or a steam-powered English mill turning weeds into clothing, or Fiona lying in her bed turning air into Fiona.
Neal Stephenson,
The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer

matter compiler
molecular assembler
alchemy
nanotechnology

••••••

The matter compiler is a wonderful idea… but, and this is no flaw, it’s entirely unsurprising… I was happy to find it in The Diamond Age because I’d been thinking about re-assembling and assembling since the first inklings of understanding I had about physics — of course you’d get there. Knowing we’re made of little non-things like super-complex Lego bricks that make ever-larger structures by way of their arrangement patterns… that’s most exciting. What else could we want to do but take those bricks — take ourselves — apart and see how we can configure and reconfigure the structure? Forget about standards — everything’s a construction, a system, a plaything, a castle, a clay-thing. This is the dream of the Alchemist.

Astronomers discover complex organic matter in the universe.

Organic compounds of unexpected complexity exist throughout the universe, Prof. Sun Kwok and Dr. Yong Zhang of the University of Hong Kong have discovered, suggesting that complex organic compounds can be synthesized in space even when no life forms are present.
The  organic substance they found contains a mixture of aromatic (ring-like)  and aliphatic (chain-like) components that are so complex, their  chemical structures resemble those of coal and petroleum. Since coal and  oil are remnants of ancient life, this type of organic matter was  thought to arise only from living organisms.
…

via { Kurzweil AI }

Astronomers discover complex organic matter in the universe.

Organic compounds of unexpected complexity exist throughout the universe, Prof. Sun Kwok and Dr. Yong Zhang of the University of Hong Kong have discovered, suggesting that complex organic compounds can be synthesized in space even when no life forms are present.

The organic substance they found contains a mixture of aromatic (ring-like) and aliphatic (chain-like) components that are so complex, their chemical structures resemble those of coal and petroleum. Since coal and oil are remnants of ancient life, this type of organic matter was thought to arise only from living organisms.

via { Kurzweil AI }

I’ve just launched a new website: { OS }(In time for my mom’s birthday — for anyone who knows us personally, it’s strange, but it’s her interests that inspired my eventual { skepticism }).
This work (in progress, as part of the { Operating System }) isn’t about friendly UI or showing off my portfolio. I’ve been exploring using the web as an art medium for some time, and that allows this project to live outside the usual guidelines and constraints of “web design”.
An artwork is allowed to be wrong, to fail, and thus has the power to convey ideas that can’t be communicated in “normalized” (especially commercial) realms. Now, if the artwork lives in a dynamic space, it can allow the viewer to access information about that idea instantly — not only to stare at something contained on a gallery wall and feel unable to understand, or only to appreciate the aesthetics, but to learn and engage within that space-time.
That requires some work — at least a desire for knowledge, and scrutiny. Any designer knows that it’s a lot to ask of a public that wants to be catered to in about 3 seconds or less, or else they’re gone. But the artist understands that a mind doesn’t work that way; { enough must be missing }, otherwise the observed is uninteresting.
As I continue to build in this space, I hope to encourage exploration and thoughtfulness, and especially (for now) a consideration of a new perception — can we understand ourselves and our world in a more comprehensive way than the paper doll, Newtonian, and human-centric views that have permeated culture until now?

I’ve just launched a new website: { OS }
(In time for my mom’s birthday — for anyone who knows us personally, it’s strange, but it’s her interests that inspired my eventual { skepticism }).

This work (in progress, as part of the { Operating System }) isn’t about friendly UI or showing off my portfolio. I’ve been exploring using the web as an art medium for some time, and that allows this project to live outside the usual guidelines and constraints of “web design”.

An artwork is allowed to be wrong, to fail, and thus has the power to convey ideas that can’t be communicated in “normalized” (especially commercial) realms. Now, if the artwork lives in a dynamic space, it can allow the viewer to access information about that idea instantly — not only to stare at something contained on a gallery wall and feel unable to understand, or only to appreciate the aesthetics, but to learn and engage within that space-time.

That requires some work — at least a desire for knowledge, and scrutiny. Any designer knows that it’s a lot to ask of a public that wants to be catered to in about 3 seconds or less, or else they’re gone. But the artist understands that a mind doesn’t work that way; { enough must be missing }, otherwise the observed is uninteresting.

As I continue to build in this space, I hope to encourage exploration and thoughtfulness, and especially (for now) a consideration of a new perception — can we understand ourselves and our world in a more comprehensive way than the paper doll, Newtonian, and human-centric views that have permeated culture until now?

ohmysagan:


Has Science Found the First “White” Hole?
A white hole is a theoretical beastie that exists as a set of equations that were a by-product of Einstein’s theory of relativity. It is basically a black hole in reverse. If a black hole is an object from which nothing can escape, then a white hole is an object into which nothing can enter—it can only radiate energy and matter.
Read The Article

:O

ohmysagan:

Has Science Found the First “White” Hole?

A white hole is a theoretical beastie that exists as a set of equations that were a by-product of Einstein’s theory of relativity. It is basically a black hole in reverse. If a black hole is an object from which nothing can escape, then a white hole is an object into which nothing can enter—it can only radiate energy and matter.

Read The Article

:O

physicsphysics
physicsphysics:

Fascinating First-Ever Images of an Electron In Orbit
“It was only two years ago that IBM showed us an image of a complete molecule, atomic bonds and all, but today’s news does that one infinitesimally-sized breakthrough better. Ladies and gents, behold the first image of an electron’s path.
 
Utterly amazing stuff! The IBM breakthrough was amazing enough, but now we have images of the electron’s orbital path around a nucleus! This is good, good news, because until now physicists only had models and hypotheses to work with.

As was the case with the pentacene molecule with IBM (top left in the image), an atomic force microscope was used to capture the electron pathways, presented as darker gray bands in the other two images at center and upper left. As a quick refreseher on AFMs, they’re the microscopes that use atom-sized needles to measure individual atoms that pass underneath the pointy end.

Understand matter and you’ll understand the Universe. Heady stuff!”
[via Gizmodo]

physicsphysics:

Fascinating First-Ever Images of an Electron In Orbit

It was only two years ago that IBM showed us an image of a complete molecule, atomic bonds and all, but today’s news does that one infinitesimally-sized breakthrough better. Ladies and gents, behold the first image of an electron’s path.

Utterly amazing stuff! The IBM breakthrough was amazing enough, but now we have images of the electron’s orbital path around a nucleus! This is good, good news, because until now physicists only had models and hypotheses to work with.

As was the case with the pentacene molecule with IBM (top left in the image), an atomic force microscope was used to capture the electron pathways, presented as darker gray bands in the other two images at center and upper left. As a quick refreseher on AFMs, they’re the microscopes that use atom-sized needles to measure individual atoms that pass underneath the pointy end.

Understand matter and you’ll understand the Universe. Heady stuff!

[via Gizmodo]