freshphotons

staceythinx:

Digits is a poster series by James Adame designed for a campaign to promote classroom visits by professionals that use math and science in their jobs. 

About the project:

This campaign was created for an initiative of the State of Mass. school board to show kids the importance of studying Math and Science…We wanted to show students that Math and Science isn’t scary- it makes dreams come true and surrounds us in daily life in everything we do.

••••••

I disagree with this idea.

This isn’t any different from anything they’re been doing in school for years, except it looks a little prettier.

I know this much: it wouldn’t have worked for me — I hated math in school. HATED it. Did well enough, but knew I’d almost never have to use it in my job (and I was right — I don’t). Now, years later, I’m actually doing Trig review for fun.

What happened is that I realized the inherent magic of it. By magic, I mean the math of physics, of Alan Turing, of the Golden Ratio, of the ancient Greeks! Whereas, unfortunately, the stuff above just brings the whole process down to the “kid’s level”. Kids, who love magic and superheros and pirates and fantasy and crazy shit… and they’re telling them about dull, commonplace things like bullies and… what’s up there? Wedgies? Ok, the invisibility one is pretty cool. But it isn’t real, unlike the aforementioned examples.

Let’s not be afraid to bring the wonder of the very real, mysterious world we live in into the classroom — Hell, into our daily lives.

dannnao
OS:This image reminds me — because I almost passed it up and kept scrolling, since I’ve seen images like this a million times — last weekend I went to a roundtable at “The Helix Center for Interdisciplinary Investigation—a division of the New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute” titled “The Alpha and the Omega: Beginning and Ending”. Last weekend was “Alpha: Where does it begin?” and, if you’d like to attend on May 19th at 2:30 p.m., the subject will be “Omega: Where Does It End?”.
The speakers: { Chris Impey }, { Joseph J. Kohn }, { Tim Maudlin }, and { Mark A. Norell }.
At one point, near the end of the discussion, Tim Maudlin observed a sad truth (and I quote this somewhat loosely, as I was taking notes on my phone):

“We’re bored by people living up in the space station. We don’t really know what goes on up there; it’s not amazing anymore. New things become, quickly, old.”

From Neal Stephenson’s Anathem:

"Boredom is a mask frustration wears."

OS:
This image reminds me — because I almost passed it up and kept scrolling, since I’ve seen images like this a million times — last weekend I went to a roundtable at “The Helix Center for Interdisciplinary Investigation—a division of the New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute” titled “The Alpha and the Omega: Beginning and Ending”. Last weekend was “Alpha: Where does it begin?” and, if you’d like to attend on May 19th at 2:30 p.m., the subject will be “Omega: Where Does It End?”.

The speakers: { Chris Impey }, { Joseph J. Kohn },
{ Tim Maudlin }, and { Mark A. Norell }.

At one point, near the end of the discussion, Tim Maudlin observed a sad truth (and I quote this somewhat loosely, as I was taking notes on my phone):

We’re bored by people living up in the space station. We don’t really know what goes on up there; it’s not amazing anymore. New things become, quickly, old.

From Neal Stephenson’s Anathem:

"Boredom is a mask frustration wears."

I hate routine and thus am rarely any good at keeping one. But this article is interesting. Incentive to incorporate some monotony.

Excerpt:

If you want to develop your ability to enter the creative zone at will, you should know that there are three conditions for a really effective hypnotic trigger:

  1. Uniqueness - it should be something (or a combination of things) you don’t associate with other activities, otherwise the effect will be diluted.
  2. Emotional intensity - the kind you experience when you’re really immersed in creative work.
  3. Repetition - the more times you experience the unique trigger in association with the emotions, the stronger the association becomes.